Tag Archives | campylobacter

New chromosome map points the way through Campylobacter’s genetic controls

A study from the Institute of Food Research has produced a new map of the Campylobacter genome, showing the points where all of this pathogenic bacteria’s genes are turned on. This information is already being used to find new genes and control mechanisms that could provide us with new ways of reducing the amount of [...]

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New FSA funding to understand Campylobacter coli

Campylobacter bacteria are a leading cause of food poisoning in the UK, causing at least 500,000 infections each year. Although these cases are rarely fatal, there’s a clear need to reduce illness and its associated costs caused by these bacteria. The major source of infection is through eating undercooked poultry meat, but other sources, such [...]

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Foodborne illness by Campylobacter: little known, but very common.

Dr Arnoud van Vliet leads the Campylobacter research group at the Institute of Food Research. He recently spoke to the  BBC Radio 4 programme ‘Face the Facts’ about Campylobacter and efforts to understand and control it.  Here he blogs about Campylobacter, and will be happy to answer any questions posted in the comments below. When [...]

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The foodborne bacterium Campylobacter requires selenium for respiration of organic acids

Researchers at the Institute of Food Research have discovered why the micronutrient selenium is important to the survival of Campylobacter bacteria, which are responsible for an estimated half a million cases of food poisoning annually in the UK alone. Knowing how and why Campylobacter uses selenium could help develop ways of controlling it, benefitting public [...]

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Exposure to stomach acid primes Campylobacter for intestinal infection

Campylobacter is a major cause of foodborne gastroenteritis, with an estimated 500,000 infections annually in the UK. The most common infection route is on undercooked poultry meat, and then crossing the lining of the small intestine. To do this, the bacteria must survive the highly acidic conditions in the stomach, and then find a way [...]

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