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Tag Archives | Nathalie Juge

Nathalie Juge

‘Selfish’ bacteria link IBD and gut microbiota changes

The discovery of unusual foraging activity in bacteria species populating our gut may explain how conditions like Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) link to changes in the populations of gut bacteria. IBD affects 1 in every 250 people in the UK, but its causes are unknown. Studies have shown that IBD patients have a different profile […]

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Small intestinal crypy organoid, image by Olivia Korber

Tales from the crypt organoid culture

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects 1 in 250 people in the UK. IBD, in the form of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, is a long term condition characterised by inflammation of the lining of the gastro-intestinal tract, but the exact triggers of this inflammation aren’t known. The Institute of Food Research, strategically sponsored by the […]

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Dr Nathalie Juge

New funding to understand how beneficial bacteria break down carbohydrate

Dr Nathalie Juge has received just under £490,000 to work out at the molecular level how the beneficial bacteria in our guts break down insoluble dietary carbohydrate and host glycans – carbohydrates associated with proteins in the mucus layer that lines the gut. This is part of a larger project to be led by Professor […]

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Lactobacillus reuteri in mucus (Image by Alistair Walsham)

How gut bacteria stick around to help keep us healthy

Nathalie Juge and her group have found the first evidence for the structural mechanisms bacteria use to attach themselves to the mucus layer that lines our gut. Understanding the role that the gut microbiota plays in maintaining our health needs a full understanding of exactly how these bacteria bind to their hosts. In particular, there […]

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False colour image of R. gnavus bacteria feeding on mucus (Image: Kathryn Cross, IFR)

How bacteria with a sweet tooth may keep us healthy

Some gut bacterial strains are specifically adapted to use sugars in our gut lining to aid colonisation, potentially giving them a major influence over our gut health. We live in a symbiotic relationship with trillions of bacteria in our gut. They help us digest food, prime our immune system and keep out pathogens. In return […]

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Dr Nathalie Juge

New study to investigate how we live in harmony with gut bacteria

A new project at the Institute of Food Research will look at the mechanisms our bodies use to live in harmony with the trillions of bacteria in our digestive system. Funding of £421,000 from the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) to Dr Nathalie Juge will produce new insights into how we maintain the […]

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mucin

IFR scientists use the force to decode secrets of our gut

A new technique based on atomic force microscopy was developed at the Institute of Food Research to help ‘read’ information encoded in the gut lining. The lining of our gut is an important barrier between the outside world and our bodies. Laid out, the gut lining would cover the area of a football pitch. It […]

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Dr Nathalie Juge

Genome analysis will reveal how bacteria in our guts make themselves at home

Researchers from the Institute of Food Research, led by Dr Nathalie Juge, and The Genome Analysis Centre have published the genome sequence of a gut bacterium, to help understand how these organisms evolved their symbiotic relationships with their hosts. The relationship between gut bacteria and the gastrointestinal tract is one of IFR’s main research areas. […]

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